Home

Examples

Examples/Descriptions

Specials

Photos

Technical Info

Ordering Info

Contact Us


StrikingColor silver glass in stock on November 24, 2013.

Please keep in mind that some of these colors were in VERY limited supply when this page was posted and may already be gone.
Check the StrikingColor ArtFire storefront for current availability.


--------------------------------------------------------


StrikingColor CMX530

CMX530 glass typically strikes to a somewhat narrower range of colors than many of my other glasses. While it can still give nearly any color(s) depending on how it is worked, various shades of blue and purplish blue seem to predominate, along with light and dark ambers. Shades of purple on a yellowish tan background are fairly likely if the glass is overstruck and then the striking sequence started again one or more times. Colors generally lean toward darker shades, although pastels are possible too. CMX530 can give good color variations if you lay down hot glass on cold or otherwise lay down the surface glass in a non-uniform way. When done this way, the glass will usually hold the color variations, even after the entire bead has been reheated. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. Although this glass can give some very nice colors it can be somewhat difficult to strike and may require some patience and experimentation to get the best results. For this reason I don't recommend it for silver glass novices. Although it can sometimes be difficult, a little practice with it can pay off.


StrikingColor CMX530 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMX530 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMX530 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMX530 glass. Different views of the same bead.

StrikingColor CMX530 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMX530 glass. Different views of the same bead.



--------------------------------------------------------


StrikingColor 507FP

507FP glass can strike to a wide range of colors, from dark, vibrant ambers and blues to milky pastels and purples depending on how it is worked, with milky pastels tending to be the norm. It also tends to give good color variations based on how the glass was laid down - if you lay down hot glass on cold it will usually hold the color variations between the two, even after the entire bead has been reheated to melting temperatures. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over.


StrikingColor 507FP glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor 507FP glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor 507FP glass. Different views of the same bead.


--------------------------------------------------------

StrikingColor CM1021

CM1021 typically strikes to a wide range of color from light, creamy pastels to dark blues and amber purples. CM1021 cane is dark transparent amber with a translucent/opaque surface coloration including shades of blue, green, and brown. Although this glass can give some very nice colors it can be somewhat difficult to strike and may require some patience and experimentation to get the best results. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. All of the beads in the sample photos were made with CM1021 alone. The color variations are due solely to how the glass was worked.

CM1021 exhibits a slight tendency towards color shifting when annealed, so annealing at higher temperatures will increase the possibility of unwanted color changes.


StrikingColor CM1021 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CM1021 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CM1021 glass. Different views of the same bead.


--------------------------------------------------------

StrikingColor YELX013

StrikingColor YELX013 glass can strike to a wide range of colors. YELX013 strikes quickly and easily and works equally well by itself or as surface decoration on another base glass. This can give a range from deep vibrant colors to light pastels. The color palette is fairly similar to YEL5013 glass, but this one has less of tendency toward surface mottling and curdling color effects and also tends to be somewhat translucent. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over.


StrikingColor YELX013 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor YELX013 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor YELX013 glass. Different views of the same bead.



--------------------------------------------------------

StrikingColor CMDA1019

When worked, this glass typically strike to shades of blue and amber. The amber will sometimes also show shades of magenta/purple.
CMDA1019 cane is dark transparent amber with a slightly iridescent surface that includes shades of blue, green, and purple.
The color of CMDA1019 cane is dark transparent amber with a slightly iridescent surface that includes shades of blue, green, and purple.

All of the beads in the sample photos were made with CMDA1019 alone. The color variations are due solely to how the glass was worked.


CMDA1019 glass. Different views of the same bead.


CMDA1019 glass. Different views of the same bead.


CMDA1019 glass. Different views of the same bead.


CMDA1019 glass. Different views of the same bead.


CMDA1019 glass. Different views of the same bead.



--------------------------------------------------------

StrikingColor 1021FP

1021FP typically strike to shades of blue and amber in tones ranging from light pastels to deep, dark shades.
The color of the 1021FP cane itself is dark transparent amber with a slightly opalescent surface.

The first three beads in the sample photos were made with 1021FP alone. The color variations are due solely to how the glass was worked.
The last bead was made with StrikingColor 1021FP on the surface of Moretti/Effetre opaque white.


1021FP glass. Different views of the same bead.


1021FP glass. Different views of the same bead.


1021FP glass. Different views of the same bead.


Stripes of 1021FP glass over Moretti/Efftre opaque white that were melted in thoroughly and then gravity swirled. Different views of the same bead.


--------------------------------------------------------

Compatibility of all the glasses above with other 104 COE glasses looks good, but testing with any particular glass you plan to mix with is still advised before going into production. Obviously, compatibility will not be an issue when using any of these glasses alone. Compatibility testing was done against 104 COE Moretti/Effetre clear cane.

StrikingColor glass canes are approximately 11 inches long and average about 5-8mm in diameter. Because this cane is hand pulled, not machine made, there will be some variation in size and uniformity.

--------------------------------------------------------

Please keep in mind that these descriptions are merely guidelines. Silver glasses in general have a well deserved reputation for being unpredictable. The descriptions above are my impressions of the working characteristics of each of the various glasses after making test beads with them on a Nortel Minor torch using bottled oxygen and propane and a neutral to oxidizing flame. Those people using other setups may have different results, as will those who work the glass differently. For that reason it is impossible to predict what a particular glass might do in your hands. (Most the time I can't even get the same results out of the same rod of glass twice in a row.) So some experimentation on your part is likely to be required for the best results.

With that said, here are some general guidelines:
The variations in color shown in the sample bead photos are primarily due to variations in the heating and cooling of different parts of the beads. Because it is easier to vary the heating on a larger or longer bead, those type of beads will usually show better color variation than a standard, small round bead. Since a small round bead tends to stay a relatively uniform temperature throughout while being worked, there will be less variation in the color. One can intentionally spot-heat parts of a small round bead to help overcome this, but it can still be difficult to get enough temperature variation to achieve a wide variety of colors in a small bead. For this reason, silver glasses will usually produce better results on larger/longer beads.

Some nice color variation can often happen on beads made with a metal bead press, particularly flattened or diamond shaped beads. One suggestion I would have for those making flattened types of beads is to give a quick shot of a hot, sharp flame to the middle of the bead. Then let it cool a bit and very gently heat the entire bead. I've seen some very nice color patterns produced like this. But as always, experimentation is the best way to determine what works well with your particular setup.