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StrikingColor Glasses


Pictured on this page are various StrikingColor experimental glasses that have been made in the past. Most of these were one time glasses that will not be made again.

The photos below were taken in lighting equivalent to direct sunlight. Although I have done my best to make sure the colors shown here are an accurate representation of each glass, because of differences between computer monitors the colors shown on your screen see may not be precisely the same as seen on mine.

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StrikingColor CMA128

StrikingColor CMA128 glass can strike to a wide range of colors - anywhere from dark and earthy colors to milky pastels - depending on how it is worked. Although it initially strikes very quickly, it can sometimes be a little challenging to get it to strike to the degree one wants. Spot heating to get color variations can be helpful. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. This glass can also develop some nice surface webbing effects and variations. The beads pictured were all made with CMA128 glass alone. You can see from the photos how differently it can strike, light or dark.


StrikingColor CMA128 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMA128 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMA128 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMA128 glass. Different views of the same bead.


Box of StrikingColor CMA128 cane.

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StrikingColor CMA1210

StrikingColor CMA1210 glass can strike to a wide variety of colors - anywhere from dark ambers and blues to milky pastels and purples - depending on how it is worked. Although it initially strikes very quickly, it can sometimes be a little challenging to get it to strike to exactly the degree one wants. Spot heating to get color variations can be helpful. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. This glass can also develop some nice surface webbing effects and variations. The pictured beads were all made with CMA1210 alone.


StrikingColor CMA1210 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMA1210 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CMA1210 glass. Different views of the same bead.


Box of StrikingColor CMA1210 cane.

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The following are previous StrikingColor Glasses


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StrikingColor DA416

StrikingColor DA416 glass tends to strike to pale colors if worked slowly and darker colors if worked and struck quickly. It can be a little difficult to start the striking sequence over again and get dark colors once it has overstruck, but it is possible. Typically, this glass gives pale colors on the second and subsequent strikes, at times showing lots of tan and purple. The bottom bead went through a couple of striking sequences. The base color or the top bead went through a couple of striking sequences and then more DA416 was striped onto that surface, melted in, and struck. This gave the alternating dark and milky blue patterning in the middle of the bead.

StrikingColor DA416 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor DA416 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor DA416 glass. Different views of the same bead.

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StrikingColor CM4252

StrikingColor CM4252 glass tends to strike to rich, dark colors with a strong tendency for surface webbing of color. Starting the striking sequence over again once it has overstruck is fairly easy and usually leads to increased surface webbing of color. Anyone who has used some of the early "type A" StrikingColor glasses will recognize the way this glass works. It is very similar to those glasses. Like my earlier type A glasses, the cane itself is primarily opaque, although some of it has an opaque surface and very dark amber core.

StrikingColor CM4252 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CM4252 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CM4252 glass. Different views of the same bead.

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StrikingColor SLA423

StrikingColor SLA423 glass can strike to rich, dark colors or pale pastels, depending on how it is worked. Pastels seem to be the norm on restriking. Of the glasses on this page, SLA423 is probably the most difficult to strike consistently. Unless you are proficient with silver striking glasses, this might not be the best choice for you.

StrikingColor SLA423 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor SLA423 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor SLA423 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor SLA423 glass. Different views of the same bead.


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StrikingColor ACM5222

ACM5222 glass has some characteristics similar to both ACM5212 and BT400 glass. It strikes fast, showing color from dark to milky blues, purples, ambers, and cream colors, occasionally showing some pink as well. It can also give good surface webbing effects. Like BT400, it sometimes shows what one user described as "watercolor" effects. Striking can be a little tricky and the temperature at which striking is started will usually make a difference in the ease of striking and color achieved. Spot heating can also give good results. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. Purple colors are more likely to appear on the second or subsequent restrikes, when the glass is struck just as amber is starting to show during the cooling phase, rather than letting it get colder before striking. The first two beads in the photos are solid ACM5222 with no other glass mixed in. The last bead was made with ACM5222 shards over Moretti/Effetre black. All were worked on a Nortel Minor torch using propane and bottled oxygen. The color variations are solely due to the striking characteristics of the glass.

StrikingColor ACM5222 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor ACM5222 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor ACM5222 over Moretti/Effetre black. Different views of the same bead.

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StrikingColor CM6222

CM6222 does not seem to exhibit as wide a range of color as some of my other glasses. It mainly strikes to shades of blue and purple/blue and can give some very nice purples. It also tends to strike uniformly, rather than showing the color striations and variation that some of my other glasses show when a bead is made by laying down glass at various temperatures. The best way to get color variations in this glass is by spot heating once the bead has been shaped. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. The beads in the photos are solid CM6222 with no other glass mixed in. All were worked on a Nortel Minor torch using propane and bottled oxygen. The color variations are solely due to the striking characteristics of the glass.

StrikingColor CM6222 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CM6222 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CM6222 glass. Different views of the same bead.

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StrikingColor ACM5212

StrikingColor ACM5212 glass is very similar to the earlier ACM-521 glass. ACM5212 cane is opaque with a multi-colored surface. It strikes hard and fast, showing good color that tends towards dark to milky blues, dark amber/browns, and cream color. As can be seen in the sample bead photos below, it shows good surface webbing and color variations. Striking can be a little tricky and striking before it gets too cold, just as amber is starting to show in spots, seems to give the best results. The beads below are solid ACM5212.

StrikingColor ACM5212 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor ACM5212 glass. Different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor ACM5212 glass. Different views of the same bead.


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StrikingColor 1026

StrikingColor 1026 glass. Two views of the same bead before annealing.

StrikingColor 1026 glass. Two views of the same bead after annealing.


StrikingColor 1026 glass. Two views of the same bead before annealing.

StrikingColor 1026 glass. Two views of the same bead after annealing.

StrikingColor 1026 glass tends to strike to milky blues and greens reminiscent of ocean colors. There is likely to be a color shift when annealed. The photos above illustrate the color shift encountered when annealing at 930F for a little over an hour. The first of each of the two photos shows the original bead, and the second the color after annealing.

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StrikingColor CLR111

StrikingColor CLR111 glass over CIM Hades black. Same view of the bead, showing color before (left) and after annealing.



Solid StrikingColor CLR111 glass. Same view of the bead, showing color before (left) and after annealing.

Solid StrikingColor CLR111 glass. Three different views of the same bead.


StrikingColor CLR111 glass over layer of CIM Hades black on clear core. Same bead, different views.


StrikingColor CLR111 glass can be used alone, but was formulated for use over a dark background color. Colors tend to stay transparent or translucent after striking.


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StrikingColor DA1104

StrikingColor DA1104 glass. Same bead, different views.


StrikingColor DA1104 glass. Same bead, different views.



StrikingColor DA1104 glass. Same bead, different views.



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StrikingColor DA1113

StrikingColor DA1113 glass. Same bead, different views.


StrikingColor DA1113 glass. Same bead, different views.


StrikingColor DA1113 glass. The two sides of the same lentil bead.


StrikingColor DA1113 can be difficult to use. It strikes to a variety of colors, but sometimes exhibits a tendency to produce a hazy surface. This glass is not recommended for those without substantial silver glass experience.



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StrikingColor CBM1107


StrikingColor CBM1107 glass. Same bead, different views.


StrikingColor CBM1107 glass. Same bead, different views.


StrikingColor Stripes of CBM1107 glass laid over a clear core. Different views of the same bead


StrikingColor CMB1107 is another glass which can be somewhat difficult to use. It strikes to a variety of colors, although primarily to blue and blue/green. It can produce substantial surface effects with a strong tendency to produce light blue color mottling on a dark blue background. It generally leans toward dark colors when handled incorrectly. This glass is not recommended for those with limited silver glass experience.



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Please keep in mind that these descriptions are merely guidelines. Silver glasses in general have a well deserved reputation for being unpredictable. The descriptions above are my impressions of the working characteristics of each of the various glasses after making test beads with them on a Nortel Minor torch using bottled oxygen and propane and a neutral to oxidizing flame. Those people using other setups may have different results, as will those who work the glass differently. For that reason it is impossible to predict what a particular glass might do in your hands. (Most the time I can't even get the same results out of the same rod of glass twice in a row.) So some experimentation on your part is likely to be required for the best results.

With that said, here are some general guidelines:
The variations in color shown in the sample bead photos are primarily due to variations in the heating and cooling of different parts of the beads. Because it is easier to vary the heating on a larger or longer bead, those type of beads will usually show better color variation than a standard, small round bead. Since a small round bead tends to stay a relatively uniform temperature throughout while being worked, there will be less variation in the color. One can intentionally spot-heat parts of a small round bead to help overcome this, but it can still be difficult to get enough temperature variation to achieve a wide variety of colors in a small bead. For this reason, silver glasses will usually produce better results on larger/longer beads.

Some nice color variation can often happen on beads made with a metal bead press, particularly flattened or diamond shaped beads. One suggestion I would have for those making flattened types of beads is to give a quick shot of a hot, sharp flame to the middle of the bead. Then let it cool a bit and very gently heat the entire bead. I've seen some very nice color patterns produced like this. But as always, experimentation is the best way to determine what works well with your particular setup.